Religion Spirituality

“Worship Is …” Sage Insight from William Temple

 
Worship is
 
the submission of all our nature to God.

It is the quickening of the conscience by His holiness;
the nourishment of mind with His truth;
the purifying of the imagination by His beauty;
the opening of the heart to His love;
the surrender of will to His purpose –

and all of this gathered up in adoration,
the most selfless emotion of which our nature is capable,
and therefore the chief remedy
of that self-centeredness
which is our original sin
and the source of all actual sin.

William Temple, 1881 – 1944
 

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  • Yes indeed it is beautiful to read this today…

    Worship is

    the submission of all our nature to God.
    It is the quickening of the conscience by His holiness;
    the nourishment of mind with His truth;
    the purifying of the imagination by His beauty;
    the opening of the heart to His love;
    the surrender of will to His purpose –
    and all of this gathered up in adoration,
    the most selfless emotion of which our nature is capable,
    and therefore the chief remedy
    of that self-centeredness
    which is our original sin
    and the source of all actual sin.
    William Temple, 1881 – 1944

    William Temple, 1881 – 1944 wrote this poem with heartfelt loyalty to worship….or did he?

    1881 – 1944:

    Indian Wars is the name generally used in the United States to describe a series of conflicts between the United States and Native Americans (formerly known as “Indians”). Also generally included in this term are those Colonial American wars with Native Americans that preceded the creation of the United States.
    The wars, which ranged from colonial times to the Wounded Knee massacre and “closing” of the American frontier in 1890, generally resulted in the conquest of American Indians and their assimilation or forced relocation to Indian reservations. Citing figures from an 1894 estimate by the United States Census Bureau, one scholar has calculated that the more than 40 wars from 1775 to 1890 reportedly claimed the lives of some 45,000 Indians and 19,000 whites. This rough estimate includes women and children on both sides, since noncombatants were often killed in frontier “massacres”.
    The Indian Wars comprised a series of smaller wars. American Indians were (and remain) diverse peoples with their own histories; throughout the wars, they were not a single people any more than Europeans were. Living in societies organized in a variety of ways, American Indians usually made decisions about war and peace at the local level, though they sometimes fought as part of formal alliances, such as the Iroquois Confederation, or in temporary confederacies inspired by leaders such as Tecumseh.

    “sigh” (Lord for give them for they know what they do” Amen

    Sincerely “Dine’ Nova”

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