[This is quoted with permission from a short post by a friend a few weeks ago.]

Let’s say we live in a world where ISIS has been defeated.

Let’s say a war was fought, and ISIS lost. Then, let’s say a neighbor decides to build a monument to ISIS, fly a flag in honor of ISIS, organize a rally in defense and support of ISIS. I imagine we’d be outraged. I’m guessing we would not want their “legacy” to be memorialized in any way. “Nip it in the bud,” I guess we’d say.

“They lost!” I imagine we’d shout.

Although, we probably wouldn’t have to because someone would have made it illegal one second after the war ended. Because that’s how things go in battle. The “loser” does not get to frame the narrative. Just ask Native Americans about that.

OK. Now, let’s say

we live in a world where the Confederacy was defeated. And, in fact, that’s the world we DO live in. A war was fought, and the Confederacy lost. And yet, we continue to allow monuments, flags, and rallies in their defense and support. We coddle them.

And then we’re surprised when they march with (Tiki) torches in the streets.


 

See also: