Martin Luther apparently liked to write about faith.

Do we not have to admit that faith in the ever-active, ever-creative, ever-loving, ever-redeeming God of the Bible would quickly produce some repurcussions of good-will in the believer?
I love his saying that faith “does not even ask whether good works SHOULD be done”! God made humans. God loves the human race. It is the nature of the beast that when a human responds to God in faith there is engendered an impulse to do something or other GOOD.

O, this faith is a living, busy, active, powerful thing!

It is impossible that it should not be ceaselessly doing that which is good. It does not even ask whether good works should be done; but before the question can be asked, it has done them, and it is constantly engaged in doing them.

Certainly we can disagree about the effectiveness or long-term wisdom of some people’s acts of goodness – including our own.
And we have the ever-potent human ability to get entangled in questions of what really is good and what is not. Still, do we not have to admit that faith in the ever-active, ever-creative, ever-loving, ever-redeeming God of the Bible would quickly produce some repurcussions of good-will in the believer?

“He who does not do such works, is a man without faith.”
Luther even goes on to say works are a clear evidence of faith. He’s pretty blunt; sounds like James 2. And he points out how we can distract ourselves from the inconvenience of living faith by arguing and debating about what faith is and what good works are and how they relate and what is their sequence, etc. etc.

But he who does not do such works, is a man without faith. He gropes and casts about him to find faith and good works, not knowing what either of them is, and yet prattles and idly multiplies words about faith and good works.

[This is quoted from Dallas Willard’s Spirit of the Disciplines: Understanding How God Changes Lives, 1988, HarperCollins, p39. The chapter is “Salvation is a Llife”.]